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Home page > Research teams > Cell wall proteins and Development

Cell wall proteins and Development

The plant cell wall is a dynamic structure playing important roles during growth, differentiation, during the interactions with pathogens and in response to environmental abiotic factors. The cell wall is both a source and a site of perception of signals. Our work aims at understanding the function of cell wall proteins during development. It requires (i) the identification of cell wall proteins and of the corresponding genes, (ii) the following of the dynamics of the cell wall proteome in various physiological conditions, and (iii) functional analyses.


Five topics are presently worked out:
- Structural and functional proteomics
- Structure-function relationships for proteins having domains of interactions with cell wall components
- Lectin-kinase receptors and cell walls ligands
- Spatio-temporal expression of cell wall proteins during development
- Functional analysis of CIII peroxidases during Arabidopsis thaliana development


The Cell wall proteins and Development team has organized:

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- The meeting of the French Cell Wall Network, in 2008




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- The annual meeting of the French Proteomics Network (Protéome vert), in 2011.




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The mixOmics Summer School in the frame of COST FA1306 The quest for tolerant varieties: phenotyping at plant and cellular level, in 2016.





Elisabeth JAMET is guest co-editor with Véronique Santoni of the Special issue of Proteomes devoted to Plant Proteomics in 2017.






E JAMET is also guest co-editor with Christophe Dunand of the Special Issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS) which will be devoted to Plant cell wall proteins and Development in 2018.





Keywords: cell elongation, cell surface, cell wall-plasma membrane attachement, cell wall protein, cell wall, development, glycoprotein, protein-protein interaction, proteomics